Fitting Compression Garments

Compression garments should fit snug and comfortably to ensure 100% compliance. But, not all compression garments are created equal.

Each person’s limb is unique and responds differently to compression; age, the condition of skin and tissues, and ability to apply and remove a garment are important considerations in garment choice. Knowing the many options available and the differences between the various garment brands will help in finding the best garment. Ready- made garments are generally a good starting point if the limb length and shape are fairly standard. If the patient has moderate or severe lymphedema, or if the shape of the limb is more bulbous in one or more areas, or the limb is extra short or long, you may need to fit a custom made garment.

If the patient does not wear a daytime garment, the benefits of intensive treatment will be lost, so fit and comfort are important. The lymphedema therapist and fitter must be willing to explore options with the patient. The therapist should also periodically check the garment fit and effectiveness, and modify the system as needed, to ensure the best outcome. If a circular garment is not firm enough to control the swelling, a different garment type or compression level for specific activities such as exercise or gardening may be considered. Garments should be replaced at least every 6 months to ensure the patient is getting the prescribed compression.

Sometimes additional accessories like Swell Spots can be used to facilitate or improve the fit of a garment. Swell Spots are professionally designed treatment pads that tuck into garments or under bandages. Use them to address particularly troublesome areas of edema, fill concavities, or diffuse pressure points.

Footnotes:

Radke, Lori. “Top 10 Self-Care Tips.” Pathways. Summer 2015: 14. Print.

www.solaris.com

Compression Shapewear by Wear Ease

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I am frequently asked for a quantifiable measurement of the compression level provided by our garments. The level of compression provided by Wear Ease garments depends on each individual fit. Providing compression with the fit of a garment for the girth of a torso is more difficult than fitting a limb. The larger the girth, the more difficult it is to provide compression.

Wear Ease Shapewear is a line of sewn garments specifically designed to help manage swelling resulting from surgery or lymphedema.  All shapewear items (780, 910, 912, 915 and 970) are constructed of a sturdy and compressive fabric   (80% nylon/20% spandex)   that feels cool and comfortable to the touch.  These garments were designed to provide maximum comfort and compression that results in 100% compliance when fitted properly.   All styles in this group are designed and sewn with pockets to hold a lightweight or leisure breast form.

Mild Compression

The level of compression provided by Wear Ease garments depends on each individual fit.  Providing compression with the fit of a garment for the girth of a torso is more difficult than fitting a limb.  The larger the girth, the more difficult it is to provide compression.

Since Wear Ease products are made to fit different shapes and sizes of torsos, it is difficult to quote a standard measurement that applies to each garment.  Depending on the fit of the garment, a mild level of  compression within the range of 10-16 mmhg may be achieved.  If the garment is any tighter than this, it will not be comfortable and it won’t be worn (per discussions with lymphedema therapists and designers).

Proper Fit

Wear Ease compression shapewear should fit snug and comfortably to ensure 100% compliance.

If the garment feels tight, then the next larger size should be selected.  If the garment fits loose then the next smaller size should be selected.

Wear Ease compression shapewear is a sewn garment and can be worn to bed at night to ensure continual compression.  Items that are constructed of circular knit cannot be worn to bed because they may result in the effects of a tourniquet.

Value 

Wear Ease Shapewear:

  • Supportive and quality fabric
  • Designed specifically for the post-surgical and lymphatic needs
  • Practical garment for air travel, exercise and bed

Who Benefits from Wearing a Post-Surgical Bra?

Women who plan to have any type of breast or chest surgery procedure

Women who plan to have any type of breast or chest surgery or procedure will benefit from wearing a post-surgical bra. Post-surgery bras are an important step in the healing process. The chest area is stabilized and kept free from infection. Scaring and swelling are reduced with compression, and drain tubes are accommodated.

After A Mastectomy (breast cancer surgery)

Breast cancer is the leading type of cancer among women in the United States. Based on the National Cancer Institute’s cancer statistics report (2005-2007), 12% of women (or one out of eight) in the United States will develop breast cancer at some point in their lives.

After any type of mastectomy/breast cancer surgery a post-surgical bra will provide support and comfort for the remaining breast.  The added drain tube pouches anchor and hold surgical drain tubes and bulbs in place providing additional comfort and convenience by eliminating pulling on the incision.  And fiberfill breast forms restore shape (temporarily) without discomfort.

There is also a great deal of discussion about wearing compression bras right after surgery to help eliminate the incidence of lymphedema following breast cancer surgery.

The compression bra can benefit in the following ways:

  • Minimizes Swelling
  • Speeds Up the Healing Process
  • Improves Blood Circulation

According to the National Cancer Institute, the overall incidence of upper extremity lymphedema can range from 8% to 56% two years following the surgery.

After Cosmetic or Reconstructive Procedures

This represents a growing number of medical patients. Last year the American Society of Plastic Surgeons reported over half a million breast operations: including breast lifts, breast augmentations, reductions, and reconstructions. It can take from a few weeks to several months for these women to get back into normal looking bras.

After cosmetic surgery or reconstructive surgery, a woman’s bust line has changed and bras can provide both support and look great as well as enhance the breast augmentation healing process.

Added support prevents ongoing gravity affecting the shape and appearance of the breasts.  The new implants act as a small (or large…) battering ram constantly putting pressure and stretch on the lower portion of the breast tissue and skin, and the breast tissue and skin will lose that fight every time.  http://www.drmoliver.com/bras-after-breast-augmentation-houston 

After Heart Surgery

According to my.clevelandclinic.org about one third of all (150,000 a year) coronary artery bypass surgeries (CABG) are performed on women.  A front closure post-surgical bra will hold the breasts together and prevent the breasts from pulling on the incision.  Normally, older women who are the majority of the candidates for heart surgery have heavier breasts. The surgery results in cutting all the muscles and tendons eliminating that support to the breasts. Wearing a post-surgical bra throughout the recovery period will reduce pulling on the scare tissue and pain in the scar area.

 

 

 

Real Life Heroines: Celebrating Life

Real Life Heroines: Celebrating Life
©Tara A. Spears
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What could be a really sad situation is instead a joyful tribute to the more than 500 brave women from all over Nayarit that come together for this weekend’s annual Cancer de Mama Clinic. Compassion and positive energy flows between the clients and volunteer staff as evidenced by all the smiles and hugs. It takes a strong woman to rise above her personal pain to say ‘gracias’ and enjoy a day with new friends. Many of the clients express appreciation for the clinic service by giving the staff beautiful letters or handmade treats. ( the center photo)
Proof that the La Penita Cancer de Mama is a success is the huge positive response to the event. Women breast cancer survivor travel for hours in order to receive a free prosthesis and modified bras. Each client also receives tit bits: knit fiber-filled boobs that can get wet and therefore are great in this hot, humid climate. In addition, free transportation is arranged and a delicious meal provided as well as coupons to shop in the free store for used clothing. There are games to help fill the wait time between being fitted and the bras being sewn.
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Another option for the ladies is to visit the hat shack for a scarf or hat. This is particularly helpful to those who are bald from chemotherapy. Right next to hat shack is the salon La Penita: the women can get a haircut, facial or wig. Now that’s a girly way of de-stressing!
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Thanks to 200 Volunteers: The Cancer de Mama Clinic was started by Jackie Jackson. Like so many excellent ideas, the concept of providing after surgery care fulfilled a great need in this Mexican state. Immediately, just by word of mouth among the Mexican medical community, the number of women traveling for help rapidly increased. Fortunately many kind hearted individuals in Jaltemba Bay, primarily seasonal residents, kicked into high gear and went about the time consuming task of finding the stock in Canada and the US and getting it transported here. This first weekend of each February event is a year-long effort of a dedicated executive committee who plans and makes arrangements for all phases of the clinic. An amazing group of department chairs organize the materials and volunteers for operating the clinic. Many local merchants donate food items that become the meal for the clients and volunteers. As the Cancer de Mama Clinic supervisor, Susan Sloan says it best: “To all of the people who give so much, Thank You for your countless hours, your tears, your compassion, your laughter, sore muscles and tired feet! We did a great job and should be proud of ourselves.”
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Applause goes to the brave survivors and all my neighbors that donate in any way. It is these true heroines who make a difference. See you next year!
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Lymphedema Awareness

What is Lymphedema?  

1100After breast cancer treatment, localized swelling is normal and should resolve with time. However, you may also be at risk of developing lymphedema, which is a more serious form of swelling that affects the arm or trunk on the same side of your body as your breast cancer. It is important to realize that the symptoms of lymphedema may begin months or even years after your breast cancer treatment. When diagnosed early, resolving lymphedema with treatment is much more successful. Recognize the signs and symptoms in their earliest stages.

 

 

 

Symptoms & Causes

Be aware of your body

  • A limb or body part is swollen
  • Swelling worsens over time
  • Repeated episode of infection
  • Sensation of heaviness and limited motion
  • Clothes, jewelry  or shoes no longer fit
  • Hardening and thickening of skin
  • Decreased flexibility
  • Aching or general discomfort
  • Skin tightness

Consult with your physician or nurse if you notice any of these symptoms.

Risk Reduction: Reduce the risk of lymphedema for those who have had lymph node removal and/or radiation

  • Keep A Healthy Diet: Maintaining a healthy weight lowers the risk for developing lymphedema. Lower sodium intake.
  • Keep Skin Protected: Use pH balanced lotions and soaps. Protect hands with gloves when cleaning.
  • Avoid Burns: Protect your arm from sunburn. Use oven mits when cooking & avoid splash burns from steaming foods. Do not use hot tubs or saunas.
  • Avoid Muscle Strain: It is okay to do normal activities & exercise with the affected arm, but don’t overdo it! Consult with a doctor about the level of activity that is right for you.
  • Avoid Restrictive Clothing: Wearing tight jewelry on the affected arm or hand will create a tourniquet effect. Blood pressure should be taken on the unaffected arm or thigh when both arms are affected. Carry briefcases and/or purses on the opposite arm.
  • Avoid Infection: Have blood drawn & shots given on the unaffected arm. Keep your skin clean and protected from cuts and scratches. Always carry band-aids!

Lymphedema Risk Assessment Tool

Take the following Lymphedema Risk Assessment Tool to figure out your relative risk of developing secondary arm or leg lymphedema. If you have already been diagnosed with lymphedema, this assessment guide can also help determine the risk of it becoming worse. Once you have added up your score, you can determine whether you are LOW, MODERATE, or HIGH RISK. If you are at risk, contact a local Certified Lymphedema Therapist. Find a local Certified Therapist here

DOWNLOAD TOOL

Helpful Resources

National Lymphedema Network 
StepUp-SpeakOut
Lymph Notes
Breastcancer.org 

 

Donate to the 2017 Cancer de Mama Clinic

  Donate to the 2017 Cancer de Mama Clinic

  If you would like to help out for the 2017 clinic you can contact the clinic directly by using their contact form on their website: HERE

Or you can contact us to coordinate donation shipments.

1-866-251-0076

info@wearease.com

Wish List for Donations

  • GENTLY USED BRAS (Please make sure bras are clean, and have NO FOAM CUPS, NO DEMI CUPS)
  • GENTLY USED PROSTHETIC BRAS
  • GENTLY USED PROSTHETIC FORMS
  • KNITTED OR CROCHETED TIT BITS (especially large size)
  • SLEEP CAPS THAT STRETCH TO 11″

The deadline to receive donations for the 2017 clinic is October 1, 2016.

2015 Cancer de Mama Clinic

If you would like to help donate for the 2016 clinic, please click here

 

Posted on by

pink  Cancer de Mama has wrapped up for another year, with 478 women being fitted with prothetis and special bras, (50 more ladies than last year).  Preparations begin long before the weekend of the clinic, with the sorting of appoximately 5000 bras into their respective sizes, and set up of the clubhouse into comfortable fitting rooms.    The ladies are served a hot lunch, and food preparation begins before sunrise for Barry and his group of slicers, dicers and choppers.  image  image  image lunchcdm Meanwhile, down in  the clubhouse – it is a hive of activity.  The ladies are lined up awaiting their turn to be “fitted”, image  and the fitters are busy collecting the items necessary to “fit” each lady.  image image  The “sewing” and “pinning” group are hard at it, image image  and the pool area is  alive with activity, overseen by Maruka.  image image   The volunteers are registered and sent to their respective areas. image image The road is watered to keep the dust down – who knew it would RAIN!!  image image OT and her group register all the ladies,image   some of which proceed to the “craft” table to create beautiful “Thank You” cards for the Clinic team members.    image Heather is busy at the “Free Store” image image  And “Make Overs” are created at the Hat & Wig Shop.  image    image  Behind the scenes, there are  people doing Traffic Control, image imagedriving the ATV People Movers, image imageVan Drivers,

Record Keeping, image

Dishwashers, Kitchen Staff,kitchen crew

Cooks imageand Clean up crew, imageall working in tandum to make the Clinic the success it is.  The volunteers are kept fed and watered by Marion and her group of helpers, image image image

And at the end of the day – Everyone goes home happy and satisfied!image  

Special thanks to Susan Sloan as clinic coordinator. We can only imagine how many hours of dedication organizing this requires even with an excellent team.clinic coordinators  THANK YOU EVERYONE FOR A JOB WELL DONE!!

 

Real Life Heroines: Celebrating Life

Real Life Heroines: Celebrating Life
©Tara A. Spears

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What could be a really sad situation is instead a joyful tribute to the more than 500 brave women from all over Nayarit that come together for this weekend’s annual Cancer de Mama Clinic. Compassion and positive energy flows between the clients and volunteer staff as evidenced by all the smiles and hugs. It takes a strong woman to rise above her personal pain to say ‘gracias’ and enjoy a day with new friends. Many of the clients express appreciation for the clinic service by giving the staff beautiful letters or handmade treats. ( the center photo)

Proof that the La Penita Cancer de Mama is a success is the huge positive response to the event. Women breast cancer survivor travel for hours in order to receive a free prosthesis and modified bras. Each client also receives tit bits: knit fiber-filled boobs that can get wet and therefore are great in this hot, humid climate. In addition, free transportation is arranged and a delicious meal provided as well as coupons to shop in the free store for used clothing. There are games to help fill the wait time between being fitted and the bras being sewn.

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Another option for the ladies is to visit the hat shack for a scarf or hat. This is particularly helpful to those who are bald from chemotherapy. Right next to hat shack is the salon La Penita: the women can get a haircut, facial or wig. Now that’s a girly way of de-stressing!

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Thanks to 200 Volunteers: The Cancer de Mama Clinic was started by Jackie Jackson. Like so many excellent ideas, the concept of providing after surgery care fulfilled a great need in this Mexican state. Immediately, just by word of mouth among the Mexican medical community, the number of women traveling for help rapidly increased. Fortunately many kind hearted individuals in Jaltemba Bay, primarily seasonal residents, kicked into high gear and went about the time consuming task of finding the stock in Canada and the US and getting it transported here. This first weekend of each February event is a year-long effort of a dedicated executive committee who plans and makes arrangements for all phases of the clinic. An amazing group of department chairs organize the materials and volunteers for operating the clinic. Many local merchants donate food items that become the meal for the clients and volunteers. As the Cancer de Mama Clinic supervisor, Susan Sloan says it best: “To all of the people who give so much, Thank You for your countless hours, your tears, your compassion, your laughter, sore muscles and tired feet! We did a great job and should be proud of ourselves.”

aa4Applause goes to the brave survivors and all my neighbors that donate in any way. It is these true heroines who make a difference. See you next year!

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Wear Ease will be attending The Klose Lymphedema Conference, April 9-11.

Wear Ease will be attending the 4th Klose Lymphedema Conference, April 9-11, 2015 at University of Colorado Hospital in Denver, Colorado. Klose Training is partnering with Lymphedema Seminars to bring an outstanding group of lymphedema-specialist physicians and therapists to the podium.

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Below is a partial list of the informative presentations you’ll learn from at the Conference. The full schedule is provided at klosetraining.com/klc-2015.

  • Lymphatic Research: Current and Future, Eva Sevick-Muraca, PhD
  • Current Approaches to Breast Reconstructive Surgery, Jay Granzow, MD, MPH, FACS
  • The Physician’s Role in the Treatment of Lymphedema, Kathleen Francis, MD
  • Current Surgical Procedures in the Treatment of Lymphedema, Jay Granzow, MD, MPH, FACS
  • Obesity, Obesity-Associated Lymphedema, and Lipedema, Tobias Bertsch, MD, PhD
  • And much more!

Pre-Conference Workshops on April 9 will offer bandaging strategies for challenging patientsincluding those with obesity-associated lymphedema, lipedema and genital edema. You’ll also get a hands-on opportunity to learn how to provide custom garment fitting with the CircAid Reduction Kit.

Klose Training’s conferences provide a smaller venue that fosters a fun and interactive experience. All meals are included in your tuition. Register soon to ensure your participation!

The Conference presentations will provide 15.25 contact hours and the Pre-Conference Workshops will add another 6.5 contact hours. For details and to register, please visit klosetraining.com/klc-2015 or call 303-245-0333.

Dates:

April 9: Pre-Conference Workshops

April 9-11: Lymphedema Conference

Location:

University of Colorado Hospital – Denver

Price:

Pre-Conference Workshops: $75

Conference: $450

Contact Information:

303-245-0333

laura@klosetraining.com

http://klosetraining.com/klc-2015

We look forward to meeting you!